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    Nadia Roan, PhD

    TitleAssistant Professor
    SchoolUCSF School of Medicine
    DepartmentUrology
    Address1450 3rd Street
    San Francisco CA 94158
    Phone415-734-4883

       Biography 
       Awards and Honors
      UCSF2014 - 2015Center for AIDS Research Basic Science HIV/AIDS grant
      UCSF2013 - 2015Hellman Award for Early-Career Faculty
      NIH2013 - 2016K99/R00
      Dept. of Urology, UCSF2012 - 2013KURe K12
      The J. David Gladstone Institute, UCSF.2012Centers for AIDS Research Early Career Award of Excellence in Basic Research
      The J. David Gladstone Institute, UCSF.2012Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology Award for Scientific Excellence
      The J. David Gladstone Institute, UCSF.2008 - 2010A.P. Giannini Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship
      NIH.2006Travel Award for the 11th International Symposium on Human Chlamydial Infections
      Harvard Medical School.2004Manfred Karnovsky Fellowship Award
      U.C. Berkeley.2001Outstanding Scholar Award
      Harvard Medical School.2001 - 2004National Science Foundation Pre-Doctoral Fellowship
      U.C. Berkeley.2001University Medal Finalist
      U.C. Berkeley.2001F.H. Carpenter Memorial Price in Biochemistry

       Overview 
       Overview
      Dr. Roan has had a long-standing interest in understanding the effect of host factors on microbial pathogens of the genital mucosa. Her research as a graduate student led to new insights into the nature of the mucosal immune response directed against the most common sexually transmitted bacterium C. trachomatis. She created and characterized C. trachomatis-specific TCR transgenic and retrogenic mice, and used these mice as tools to understand the inflammatory response to C. trachomatis within the upper female reproductive tract (FRT). During her postdoctoral years, Dr. Roan continued her studies on sexually transmitted microbes, but transitioned to studying HIV-1, a viral pathogen with a devastating effect on global health. She focused on understanding the effect of semen components on HIV-1 infection. She identified and characterized amyloid fibrils made up of peptides derived from the major components of the semen coagulum. These amyloids markedly enhance HIV infection, in part by promoting the attachment of HIV-1 to their cellular targets.

      Dr. Roan’s current research interest focuses on two major areas. First, she is investigating the mechanisms by which semen components such as coagulum-derived amyloids promote HIV transmission, and the effects of these components on the effectiveness of currently available anti-HIV microbicides. This understanding will help the development of a new class of “combination microbicides” that contain components targeting both HIV-1 and naturally-occurring factors that promote HIV-1 infectivity. In parallel, a high-thoroughput screen is currently being conducted to identify compounds that inhibit the activity of viral-enhancing factors in semen. Dr. Roan’s second line of research is to understand the physiological functions of semen amyloids and their effects on cells present in the genital mucosa. This understanding will reveal insights into the roles of these semen factors in reproduction, which can lead to novel ways to enhance fertility or to the development of a new class of contraceptives.


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       Bibliographic 
       Publications
      Publications listed below are automatically derived from MEDLINE/PubMed and other sources, which might result in incorrect or missing publications. Researchers can login to make corrections and additions, or contact us for help.
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      1. Zirafi O, Kim KA, Roan NR, Kluge SF, Müller JA, Jiang S, Mayer B, Greene WC, Kirchhoff F, Münch J. Semen enhances HIV infectivity and impairs the antiviral efficacy of microbicides. Sci Transl Med. 2014 Nov 12; 6(262):262ra157.
        View in: PubMed
      2. Usmani S, Liu H, Pilcher CD, Witkowska HE, Kirchhoff F, Greene WC, Münch J, Roan NR. HIV-enhancing Amyloids Are Prevalent in Fresh Semen and Are a Determinant for Semen's Ability to Enhance HIV Infection: Relevance for HIV Transmission. AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 2014 Oct; 30 Suppl 1:A183-4.
        View in: PubMed
      3. Zirafi O, Kim KA, Roan NR, Mayer B, Kluge S, Jiang S, Greene WC, Kirchhoff F, Münch J. Semen-mediated Enhancement of HIV Infection Markedly Impairs the Antiviral Efficacy of Microbicides. AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 2014 Oct; 30 Suppl 1:A183.
        View in: PubMed
      4. French KC, Roan NR, Makhatadze GI. Structural Characterization of Semen Coagulum-Derived SEM1(86-107) Amyloid Fibrils That Enhance HIV-1 Infection. Biochemistry. 2014 May 27; 53(20):3267-77.
        View in: PubMed
      5. Roan NR, Liu H, Usmani SM, Neidleman J, Müller JA, Avila-Herrera A, Gawanbacht A, Zirafi O, Chu S, Dong M, Kumar ST, Smith JF, Pollard KS, Fändrich M, Kirchhoff F, Münch J, Witkowska HE, Greene WC. Liquefaction of Semen Generates and Later Degrades a Conserved Semenogelin Peptide That Enhances HIV Infection. J Virol. 2014 Jul 1; 88(13):7221-34.
        View in: PubMed
      6. Roan NR, Chu S, Liu H, Neidleman J, Witkowska HE, Greene WC. Interaction of Fibronectin With Semen Amyloids Synergistically Enhances HIV Infection. J Infect Dis. 2014 Oct 1; 210(7):1062-6.
        View in: PubMed
      7. Chen JC, Johnson BA, Erikson DW, Piltonen TT, Barragan F, Chu S, Kohgadai N, Irwin JC, Greene WC, Giudice LC, Roan NR. Seminal plasma induces global transcriptomic changes associated with cell migration, proliferation and viability in endometrial epithelial cells and stromal fibroblasts. Hum Reprod. 2014 Jun; 29(6):1255-70.
        View in: PubMed
      8. Usmani SM, Zirafi O, Müller JA, Sandi-Monroy NL, Yadav JK, Meier C, Weil T, Roan NR, Greene WC, Walther P, Nilsson KP, Hammarström P, Wetzel R, Pilcher CD, Gagsteiger F, Fändrich M, Kirchhoff F, Münch J. Direct visualization of HIV-enhancing endogenous amyloid fibrils in human semen. Nat Commun. 2014 Feb 21; 5:3508.
        View in: PubMed
      9. Tang Q, Roan NR, Yamamura Y. Seminal plasma and semen amyloids enhance cytomegalovirus infection in cell culture. J Virol. 2013 Dec; 87(23):12583-91.
        View in: PubMed
      10. Yolamanova M, Meier C, Shaytan AK, Vas V, Bertoncini CW, Arnold F, Zirafi O, Usmani SM, Müller JA, Sauter D, Goffinet C, Palesch D, Walther P, Roan NR, Geiger H, Lunov O, Simmet T, Bohne J, Schrezenmeier H, Schwarz K, Ständker L, Forssmann WG, Salvatella X, Khalatur PG, Khokhlov AR, Knowles TP, Weil T, Kirchhoff F, Münch J. Peptide nanofibrils boost retroviral gene transfer and provide a rapid means for concentrating viruses. Nat Nanotechnol. 2013 Feb; 8(2):130-6.
        View in: PubMed
      11. Roan NR, Cavrois M, Greene WC. [Role of semen-derived amyloid fibrils as facilitators of HIV infection]. Med Sci (Paris). 2012 Apr; 28(4):358-60.
        View in: PubMed
      12. Roan NR, Müller JA, Liu H, Chu S, Arnold F, Stürzel CM, Walther P, Dong M, Witkowska HE, Kirchhoff F, Münch J, Greene WC. Peptides released by physiological cleavage of semen coagulum proteins form amyloids that enhance HIV infection. Cell Host Microbe. 2011 Dec 15; 10(6):541-50.
        View in: PubMed
      13. Arnold F, Schnell J, Zirafi O, Stürzel C, Meier C, Weil T, Ständker L, Forssmann WG, Roan NR, Greene WC, Kirchhoff F, Münch J. Naturally occurring fragments from two distinct regions of the prostatic acid phosphatase form amyloidogenic enhancers of HIV infection. J Virol. 2012 Jan; 86(2):1244-9.
        View in: PubMed
      14. Kim KA, Yolamanova M, Zirafi O, Roan NR, Staendker L, Forssmann WG, Burgener A, Dejucq-Rainsford N, Hahn BH, Shaw GM, Greene WC, Kirchhoff F, Münch J. Semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection is donor-dependent and correlates with the levels of SEVI. Retrovirology. 2010; 7:55.
        View in: PubMed
      15. Roan NR, Sowinski S, Münch J, Kirchhoff F, Greene WC. Aminoquinoline surfen inhibits the action of SEVI (semen-derived enhancer of viral infection). J Biol Chem. 2010 Jan 15; 285(3):1861-9.
        View in: PubMed
      16. Gondek DC, Roan NR, Starnbach MN. T cell responses in the absence of IFN-gamma exacerbate uterine infection with Chlamydia trachomatis. J Immunol. 2009 Jul 15; 183(2):1313-9.
        View in: PubMed
      17. Roan NR, Münch J, Arhel N, Mothes W, Neidleman J, Kobayashi A, Smith-McCune K, Kirchhoff F, Greene WC. The cationic properties of SEVI underlie its ability to enhance human immunodeficiency virus infection. J Virol. 2009 Jan; 83(1):73-80.
        View in: PubMed
      18. Starnbach MN, Roan NR. Conquering sexually transmitted diseases. Nat Rev Immunol. 2008 Apr; 8(4):313-7.
        View in: PubMed
      19. Grotenbreg GM, Roan NR, Guillen E, Meijers R, Wang JH, Bell GW, Starnbach MN, Ploegh HL. Discovery of CD8+ T cell epitopes in Chlamydia trachomatis infection through use of caged class I MHC tetramers. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Mar 11; 105(10):3831-6.
        View in: PubMed
      20. Roan NR, Greene WC. A seminal finding for understanding HIV transmission. Cell. 2007 Dec 14; 131(6):1044-6.
        View in: PubMed
      21. Roan NR, Starnbach MN. Immune-mediated control of Chlamydia infection. Cell Microbiol. 2008 Jan; 10(1):9-19.
        View in: PubMed
      22. Roan NR, Starnbach MN. Antigen-specific CD8+ T cells respond to Chlamydia trachomatis in the genital mucosa. J Immunol. 2006 Dec 1; 177(11):7974-9.
        View in: PubMed
      23. Roan NR, Gierahn TM, Higgins DE, Starnbach MN. Monitoring the T cell response to genital tract infection. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Aug 8; 103(32):12069-74.
        View in: PubMed
      24. Balsara ZR, Roan NR, Steele LN, Starnbach MN. Developmental regulation of Chlamydia trachomatis class I accessible protein-1, a CD8+ T cell antigen. J Infect Dis. 2006 May 15; 193(10):1459-63.
        View in: PubMed
      25. Hess D, Liu B, Roan NR, Sternglanz R, Winston F. Spt10-dependent transcriptional activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires both the Spt10 acetyltransferase domain and Spt21. Mol Cell Biol. 2004 Jan; 24(1):135-43.
        View in: PubMed
      26. D'Orazio SE, Velasquez M, Roan NR, Naveiras-Torres O, Starnbach MN. The Listeria monocytogenes lemA gene product is not required for intracellular infection or to activate fMIGWII-specific T cells. Infect Immun. 2003 Dec; 71(12):6721-7.
        View in: PubMed
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