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    Oliver Bogen, PhD

    TitleAssociate Researcher
    SchoolUCSF School of Dentistry
    DepartmentOral & Maxillofacial Surgery
    Address513 Parnassus Avenue
    San Francisco CA 94117
    Phone415-476-4902
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      Collapse Biography 
      Collapse Education and Training
      Freie Universität BerlinB.Sc. in BiochemistryDepartment of Biology, Chemistry, Pharmacy1995
      Freie Universität BerlinM.Sc. in BiochemistryDepartment of Biology, Chemistry, Pharmacy2002
      Freie Universität BerlinPh.D. (Natural Sciences)Department of Biology, Chemistry, Pharmacy2005
      University of California San FranciscoPostdoctoral ScholarOral and Maxillofacial Surgery2008

      Collapse Overview 
      Collapse Overview
      I actually wanted to become a football star… like almost every other boy at that time in Germany… fortunately, I was smart enough to realize that I wasn't talented enough for football… and I was also lucky enough to watch a movie that really inspired me… the movie is called Blade Runner (a must see!!!)… because of the movie I thought it must be super cool to become a genetic engineer trying to create artificial life forms… not knowing that science at that time was far away from even understanding the human genome (and still is!!!)… however, I studied biochemistry at the “Freie Universität Berlin“ and finished my studies with the synthesis of a photo-cleavable non-ionic detergent to improve the separation performance of complex protein mixtures in the 2 dimensional gel electrophoresis (see: Light-triggered conversion of non-ionic into ionic surfactants: towards chameleon detergents for 2-D gel electrophoresis)…
      It was at the end of my studies when I became inspired a 2nd time… this time by a number of scientific articles about the capsaicin or TRPV1 receptor… the authors were able to show that the burning sensation or pain that we feel when we eat something spicy (chili peppers) or touch something hot was due to the activation of the capsaicin/TRPV1 receptor in sensory nerve terminals (see: The capsaicin receptor: A heat activated ion channel in the pain pathway. Caterina MJ, Schumacher MA, Tominaga M, Rosen TA, Levine JD, Julius D. Nature 1997; Vol. 389, 816-824)… a little later the same group was able to demonstrate that thermal inflammatory hyperalgesia depends on the presence of the capsaicin/TRPV1 receptor in sensory nerve terminals (see: Impaired nociception and pain sensation in mice lacking the capsaicin receptor. Caterina MJ, Leffler A, Malmberg AB, Martin WJ, Trafton J, Petersen-Zeitz KR, Koltzenburg M, Basbaum AI, Julius D. Science 2000; Vol. 288, 306-313)… this was – at least in my opinion – the beginning of a new area of pain research as it was the first clear demonstration that a painful sensation can be explained by conformational changes in a single protein… I remember that I was very fascinated by these findings… and that I decided to do my PH D thesis on pain research…
      During my PH D thesis in the lab of Prof. F. Hucho I was trying to identify the molecule that renders a subpopulation of sensory afferent C-fiber nociceptors IB4 positive… IB4-binding C-fiber nociceptors constitute an important class of nociceptors and it is believed that their malfunctioning is responsible for the pain of people suffering from certain chronic inflammatory or neuropathic pain syndromes (although human C-fiber nociceptors do not react to IB4)… a better understanding of the biological function of IB4-binding C-fiber nociceptors is therefore essential for the development of new analgesics that can be used to treat chronic pain-syndromes resistant to classical opioid or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs based therapies… during my PH D thesis I was able to identify versican as a) an IB4-binding molecule and b) one of the molecules that renders IB4-binding afferent C-fiber nociceptors IB4-positive (see: Identification of versican as an isolectin B4-binding glycoprotein from mammalian spinal cord tissue)… and one of the first things that I did when I started my postdoc in the lab of Prof. JD Levine at UCSF was to elucidate some of the biological functions of the IB4-binding versican (see: 1) GDNF hyperalgesia is mediated by PLC?, MAPK/ERK, PI3K, CDK5 and SRC kinase signaling and dependent on the IB4-binding protein versican… and 2) Dependence of MCP-1 induced hyperalgesia on the IB4-binding protein versican)…
      I also initiated work to analyze whether certain pain syndromes for which our lab has established animal models are dependent on IB4-binding afferent C-fiber nociceptors or not… the idea that different nociceptor subpopulations might have different functions and that certain pain syndromes are caused by the malfunctioning of only a few of them is quite old (see for example: Tackling pain at the source: New ideas about nociceptors. Snider WD, McMahon SB. Neuron 1998; Vol. 20, 629-632)… however, nobody before had analyzed whether certain pain syndromes are dependent on IB4-binding afferent C-fiber nociceptors or not… and over the last couple of years our group was able to show that certain pain syndromes are – indeed – dependent on IB4-binding afferent C-fiber nociceptors (see for example: 1) Oxaliplatin acts on IB4-positive nociceptors to induce an oxidative stress dependent acute painful peripheral neuropathy… and 2) IB4-positive nociceptors mediate persistent muscle pain induced by GDNF)…
      Understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying chronic pain states will be a critical step in the development of new therapies to specifically target the distinct mechanisms of chronic pain… and our lab has developed an animal model for the transition from acute to chronic pain, called hyperalgesic priming, in which afferent C-fiber nociceptors that have been exposed to an inflammatory or neuropathic insult develop a long-lasting hyperalgesic response to a subsequent challenge by the proinflammatory cytokine prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, which is the target of the most commonly used class of drugs for treating pain, the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; see: Critical role of nociceptor plasticity in chronic pain. Reichling DB and Levine JD. Trends Neurosci 2009; Vol. 32, 611-618)… and it was my idea to analyze whether hyperalgesic priming is dependent on a certain subpopulation of nociceptors (see: 1) Nociceptor subpopulations involved in hyperalgesic priming… and 2) Hyperalgesic priming is restricted to IB4-positive nociceptors. Joseph EK, Levine JD. Neuroscience 2010; Vol. 169, 431-435)… moreover, since hyperalgesic priming is still present months after the precipitating inflammatory or neuropathic stimulus, it must be associated with the formation of a molecular memory in IB4-binding C-fiber nociceptors. Based on my ideas (and inspired by the excellent work of the Eric Kandel lab) we were able to demonstrate that… a) a prion-like misfolding mechanism could be responsible for the chronification of pain (see: Generation of a pain memory in the primary afferent nociceptor triggered by PKCe activation of Cpeb)… and b) that hyperalgesic priming can be reversed by the inhibition of protein translation (see: Peripheral administration of translation inhibitors reverses increased hyperalgesia in a model of chronic pain in the rat)...
      Right now I am interested in/working on the following three topics… 1) I am trying to elucidate the biological function of the IB4-reactivity of IB4(+)-C-fiber nociceptors (I have already an idea)… 2) I am trying to develop a method to selectively down-regulate the expression level of proteins in nociceptor subpopulations (first experiments were quite promising), and last but not least 3) I am trying to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying mechanical hyperalgesia/allodynia (I am planning to write a small review)…




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      Collapse Publications
      Publications listed below are automatically derived from MEDLINE/PubMed and other sources, which might result in incorrect or missing publications. Researchers can login to make corrections and additions, or contact us for help.
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      1. Ferrari LF, Bogen O, Green P, Levine JD. Contribution of Piezo2 to Endothelium-Dependent Pain. Mol Pain. 2015 Jan; 11. PMID: 27655920.
        View in: PubMed
      2. Ferrari LF, Araldi D, Bogen O, Levine JD. Extracellular matrix hyaluronan signals via its CD44 receptor in the increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation. Neuroscience. 2016 Jun 2; 324:390-8. PMID: 26996509.
        View in: PubMed
      3. Conner LB, Alvarez P, Bogen O, Levine JD. Role of Kv4.3 in Vibration-Induced Muscle Pain in the Rat. J Pain. 2016 Apr; 17(4):444-50. PMID: 26721612.
        View in: PubMed
      4. Ferrari LF, Bogen O, Green P, Levine JD. Contribution of Piezo2 to endothelium-dependent pain. Mol Pain. 2015; 11(1):65. PMID: 26497944; PMCID: PMC4619430.
      5. Bogen O, Bender O, Löwe J, Blenau W, Thevis B, Schröder W, Margolis RU, Levine JD, Hucho F. Neuronally produced versican V2 renders C-fiber nociceptors IB4 -positive. J Neurochem. 2015 Jul; 134(1):147-55. PMID: 25845936; PMCID: PMC4472531.
      6. Ferrari LF, Bogen O, Reichling DB, Levine JD. Accounting for the delay in the transition from acute to chronic pain: axonal and nuclear mechanisms. J Neurosci. 2015 Jan 14; 35(2):495-507. PMID: 25589745; PMCID: PMC4293406.
      7. Alvarez P, Bogen O, Levine JD. Role of nociceptor estrogen receptor GPR30 in a rat model of endometriosis pain. Pain. 2014 Dec; 155(12):2680-6. PMID: 25280432; PMCID: PMC4250399 [Available on 12/01/15].
      8. Ferrari LF, Bogen O, Levine JD. Second messengers mediating the expression of neuroplasticity in a model of chronic pain in the rat. J Pain. 2014 Mar; 15(3):312-20. PMID: 24407022; PMCID: PMC3987850.
      9. Alvarez P, Bogen O, Chen X, Giudice LC, Levine JD. Ectopic endometrium-derived leptin produces estrogen-dependent chronic pain in a rat model of endometriosis. Neuroscience. 2014 Jan 31; 258:111-20. PMID: 24239717; PMCID: PMC3947893.
      10. Gear RW, Bogen O, Ferrari LF, Green PG, Levine JD. NOP receptor mediates anti-analgesia induced by agonist-antagonist opioids. Neuroscience. 2014 Jan 17; 257:139-48. PMID: 24188792; PMCID: PMC3947912.
      11. Hendrich J, Alvarez P, Joseph EK, Chen X, Bogen O, Levine JD. Electrophysiological correlates of hyperalgesic priming in vitro and in vivo. Pain. 2013 Oct; 154(10):2207-15. PMID: 23831864; PMCID: PMC3838101.
      12. Ferrari LF, Bogen O, Levine JD. Role of nociceptor aCaMKII in transition from acute to chronic pain (hyperalgesic priming) in male and female rats. J Neurosci. 2013 Jul 3; 33(27):11002-11. PMID: 23825405; PMCID: PMC3718370.
      13. Ferrari LF, Bogen O, Chu C, Levine JD. Peripheral administration of translation inhibitors reverses increased hyperalgesia in a model of chronic pain in the rat. J Pain. 2013 Jul; 14(7):731-8. PMID: 23664545; PMCID: PMC3700567.
      14. Joseph EK, Green PG, Bogen O, Alvarez P, Levine JD. Vascular endothelial cells mediate mechanical stimulation-induced enhancement of endothelin hyperalgesia via activation of P2X2/3 receptors on nociceptors. J Neurosci. 2013 Feb 13; 33(7):2849-59. PMID: 23407944; PMCID: PMC3711399.
      15. Alvarez P, Chen X, Bogen O, Green PG, Levine JD. IB4(+) nociceptors mediate persistent muscle pain induced by GDNF. J Neurophysiol. 2012 Nov; 108(9):2545-53. PMID: 22914655; PMCID: PMC3545184.
      16. Ferrari LF, Bogen O, Alessandri-Haber N, Levine E, Gear RW, Levine JD. Transient decrease in nociceptor GRK2 expression produces long-term enhancement in inflammatory pain. Neuroscience. 2012 Oct 11; 222:392-403. PMID: 22796071; PMCID: PMC3433493.
      17. Bogen O, Alessandri-Haber N, Chu C, Gear RW, Levine JD. Generation of a pain memory in the primary afferent nociceptor triggered by PKCe activation of CPEB. J Neurosci. 2012 Feb 8; 32(6):2018-26. PMID: 22323716; PMCID: PMC3305286.
      18. Bogen O, Milosevic P, Daroszi H, Dreger M, Hecht S, Hucho F. Light-triggered conversion of non-ionic into ionic surfactants: towards chameleon detergents for 2-D gel electrophoresis. Photochem Photobiol Sci. 2012 Mar; 11(3):497-9. PMID: 22222955.
        View in: PubMed
      19. Ferrari LF, Chum A, Bogen O, Reichling DB, Levine JD. Role of Drp1, a key mitochondrial fission protein, in neuropathic pain. J Neurosci. 2011 Aug 3; 31(31):11404-10. PMID: 21813700; PMCID: PMC3157245.
      20. Chu C, Levine E, Gear RW, Bogen O, Levine JD. Mitochondrial dependence of nerve growth factor-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Pain. 2011 Aug; 152(8):1832-7. PMID: 21570183; PMCID: PMC3161405.
      21. Ferrari LF, Bogen O, Levine JD. Nociceptor subpopulations involved in hyperalgesic priming. Neuroscience. 2010 Feb 3; 165(3):896-901. PMID: 19931357; PMCID: PMC2815163.
      22. Bogen O, Dina OA, Gear RW, Levine JD. Dependence of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 induced hyperalgesia on the isolectin B4-binding protein versican. Neuroscience. 2009 Mar 17; 159(2):780-6. PMID: 19167466; PMCID: PMC2684808.
      23. Dina OA, Khasar SG, Alessandri-Haber N, Bogen O, Chen X, Green PG, Reichling DB, Messing RO, Levine JD. Neurotoxic catecholamine metabolite in nociceptors contributes to painful peripheral neuropathy. Eur J Neurosci. 2008 Sep; 28(6):1180-90. PMID: 18783367; PMCID: PMC2746092.
      24. Bogen O, Joseph EK, Chen X, Levine JD. GDNF hyperalgesia is mediated by PLCgamma, MAPK/ERK, PI3K, CDK5 and Src family kinase signaling and dependent on the IB4-binding protein versican. Eur J Neurosci. 2008 Jul; 28(1):12-9. PMID: 18616564; PMCID: PMC2660608.
      25. Khasar SG, Burkham J, Dina OA, Brown AS, Bogen O, Alessandri-Haber N, Green PG, Reichling DB, Levine JD. Stress induces a switch of intracellular signaling in sensory neurons in a model of generalized pain. J Neurosci. 2008 May 28; 28(22):5721-30. PMID: 18509033; PMCID: PMC2518401.
      26. Joseph EK, Chen X, Bogen O, Levine JD. Oxaliplatin acts on IB4-positive nociceptors to induce an oxidative stress-dependent acute painful peripheral neuropathy. J Pain. 2008 May; 9(5):463-72. PMID: 18359667.
        View in: PubMed
      27. Summer GJ, Romero-Sandoval EA, Bogen O, Dina OA, Khasar SG, Levine JD. Proinflammatory cytokines mediating burn-injury pain. Pain. 2008 Mar; 135(1-2):98-107. PMID: 17590515.
        View in: PubMed
      28. Joseph EK, Bogen O, Alessandri-Haber N, Levine JD. PLC-beta 3 signals upstream of PKC epsilon in acute and chronic inflammatory hyperalgesia. Pain. 2007 Nov; 132(1-2):67-73. PMID: 17350763.
        View in: PubMed
      29. Bogen O, Dreger M, Gillen C, Schröder W, Hucho F. Identification of versican as an isolectin B4-binding glycoprotein from mammalian spinal cord tissue. FEBS J. 2005 Mar; 272(5):1090-102. PMID: 15720384.
        View in: PubMed
      30. Goswami C, Dreger M, Jahnel R, Bogen O, Gillen C, Hucho F. Identification and characterization of a Ca2+ -sensitive interaction of the vanilloid receptor TRPV1 with tubulin. J Neurochem. 2004 Dec; 91(5):1092-103. PMID: 15569253.
        View in: PubMed
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