Catera Wilder, PhD

Title(s)Assistant Professor, Bioengineering
SchoolSchool of Pharmacy
Address513 Parnassus Avenue, HSE
San Francisco CA 94143
Phone415-476-6452
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    Catera Wilder, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences at the University of California San Francisco and Chan Zuckerberg Biohub Investigator. She received her Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University (2016) under the direction of Manu Platt. As a UCLA Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow in the lab of Alexander Hoffmann (2016-2022) she focused on understanding innate immune and inflammatory responses by studying ISGF3 transcription factor dynamic regulation using a systems biology approach. Her work investigating the interferon signaling and transcriptional regulation has uncovered stimulus specific responses determined by coordinated stimulus-contingent positive feedback loops.

    Dr. Wilder devoted much of her training in complementary research areas to develop her own distinctive research program. As a graduate student, her studies showed that perturbations within a proteolytic network using protease inhibitors can upregulate matrix degradation in a cellular localization dependent manner, potentially leading to increased cancer cell invasion or metastasis. She published most of this work in The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology. During her training, she was awarded the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and Ford Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship. Due to collaborations on other projects, she was also a co-author on five other peer reviewed journal articles.

    Her passion to understand the complexity of cellular responses led her to study cellular signaling networks in innate immunity as a postdoctoral fellow. From these studies, she demonstrated distinct regulation of antiviral and inflammatory gene expression programs by different interferon cytokines control of feedback and feedforward loops. One manuscript for this work is currently in preparation and another published in Frontiers in Immunology. She was the recipient of the UCLA Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellowship award and two NIH T32 Postdoctoral Fellowship awards.

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    Publications listed below are automatically derived from MEDLINE/PubMed and other sources, which might result in incorrect or missing publications. Researchers can login to make corrections and additions, or contact us for help. to make corrections and additions.
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    Altmetrics Details PMC Citations indicate the number of times the publication was cited by articles in PubMed Central, and the Altmetric score represents citations in news articles and social media. (Note that publications are often cited in additional ways that are not shown here.) Fields are based on how the National Library of Medicine (NLM) classifies the publication's journal and might not represent the specific topic of the publication. Translation tags are based on the publication type and the MeSH terms NLM assigns to the publication. Some publications (especially newer ones and publications not in PubMed) might not yet be assigned Field or Translation tags.) Click a Field or Translation tag to filter the publications.
    1. High Dose IFN-β Activates GAF to Enhance Expression of ISGF3 Target Genes in MLE12 Epithelial Cells. Front Immunol. 2021; 12:651254. Kishimoto K, Wilder CL, Buchanan J, Nguyen M, Okeke C, Hoffmann A, Cheng QJ. PMID: 33897699; PMCID: PMC8062733.
      View in: PubMed   Mentions:    Fields:    Translation:AnimalsCells
    2. Dynamic Model of Protease State and Inhibitor Trafficking to Predict Protease Activity in Breast Cancer Cells. Cell Mol Bioeng. 2019 Aug; 12(4):275-288. Shockey WA, Kieslich CA, Wilder CL, Watson V, Platt MO. PMID: 31719914; PMCID: PMC6816728.
      View in: PubMed   Mentions: 1  
    3. Differential cathepsin responses to inhibitor-induced feedback: E-64 and cystatin C elevate active cathepsin S and suppress active cathepsin L in breast cancer cells. Int J Biochem Cell Biol. 2016 10; 79:199-208. Wilder CL, Walton C, Watson V, Stewart FAA, Johnson J, Peyton SR, Payne CK, Odero-Marah V, Platt MO. PMID: 27592448; PMCID: PMC5067213.
      View in: PubMed   Mentions: 9     Fields:    Translation:HumansCells
    4. Cathepsin Protease Inhibition Reduces Endometriosis Lesion Establishment. Reprod Sci. 2016 May; 23(5):623-9. Porter KM, Wieser FA, Wilder CL, Sidell N, Platt MO. PMID: 26482207; PMCID: PMC5933157.
      View in: PubMed   Mentions: 8     Fields:    Translation:HumansAnimals
    5. Muscadine grape skin extract can antagonize Snail-cathepsin L-mediated invasion, migration and osteoclastogenesis in prostate and breast cancer cells. Carcinogenesis. 2015 Sep; 36(9):1019-27. Burton LJ, Smith BA, Smith BN, Loyd Q, Nagappan P, McKeithen D, Wilder CL, Platt MO, Hudson T, Odero-Marah VA. PMID: 26069256; PMCID: PMC4643647.
      View in: PubMed   Mentions: 18     Fields:    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells
    6. Tumor necrosis factor alpha stimulates cathepsin K and V activity via juxtacrine monocyte-endothelial cell signaling and JNK activation. Mol Cell Biochem. 2012 Aug; 367(1-2):65-72. Keegan PM, Wilder CL, Platt MO. PMID: 22562303; PMCID: PMC3390414.
      View in: PubMed   Mentions: 19     Fields:    Translation:HumansCells
    7. Manipulating substrate and pH in zymography protocols selectively distinguishes cathepsins K, L, S, and V activity in cells and tissues. Arch Biochem Biophys. 2011 Dec 01; 516(1):52-7. Wilder CL, Park KY, Keegan PM, Platt MO. PMID: 21982919; PMCID: PMC3221864.
      View in: PubMed   Mentions: 35     Fields:    Translation:HumansCells
    8. Detection of femtomole quantities of mature cathepsin K with zymography. Anal Biochem. 2010 Jun 01; 401(1):91-8. Li WA, Barry ZT, Cohen JD, Wilder CL, Deeds RJ, Keegan PM, Platt MO. PMID: 20206119.
      View in: PubMed   Mentions: 24     Fields:    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells
    9. Multipathway kinase signatures of multipotent stromal cells are predictive for osteogenic differentiation: tissue-specific stem cells. Stem Cells. 2009 Nov; 27(11):2804-14. Platt MO, Wilder CL, Wells A, Griffith LG, Lauffenburger DA. PMID: 19750537; PMCID: PMC2976759.
      View in: PubMed   Mentions: 24     Fields:    Translation:HumansCells
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